Author Topic: Fuel air removal  (Read 8339 times)

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Offline ziggyh

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Fuel air removal
« on: December 09, 2014, 12:56:20 PM »
Has anyone looked into the addition of or has added a fuel/air separator systems that removes fuel/air vapor from Diesel Fuel.
ZiggyH

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Offline Brett Wolfe

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Re: Fuel air removal
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2014, 04:06:39 PM »
Ziggy,

Sorry, you will have to let us know a little more about what you are wanting to do.

Are you talking about purging air from the fuel system-- perhaps after filter change??  If so, let us know how your system is set up now (i.e. do you have a Caterpillar manual primer pump on the secondary fuel filter?).

If not, please let us know what you want.

Offline ziggyh

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Re: Fuel air removal
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2014, 06:29:26 PM »
Brett, sorry should have been more specific, the system I came across is made by FASS and similar to one called air dog as well as a few others. It is a filter system which is supposed to separate air that is trapped in the diesel fuel and supply your engine with purified fuel. The claimed benefits are increased performance and longer injector life.
 Increased performance is always desirable but is not the first concern, the longer injector life is what is on my mind.

ZiggyH

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Offline Brett Wolfe

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Re: Fuel air removal
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2014, 07:28:15 PM »
Been around diesels for a long time and have not heard of it.

Do you have a link to the product?

Thanks.

Offline ziggyh

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Re: Fuel air removal
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2014, 07:44:48 PM »
Brett,   www.fassride.com and www.pureflowtechnologies.com is another similar product.


« Last Edit: December 09, 2014, 08:01:06 PM by ziggyh »
ZiggyH

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Offline Brett Wolfe

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Re: Fuel air removal
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2014, 08:11:59 PM »
Ziggy,

Not familiar with an issue with air in diesel.  Would like to see some independent performance and MPG comparisons.  Could be valid, could be snake oil. Approaching with an open mind, just want the FACTS.

Offline ziggyh

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Re: Fuel air removal
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2014, 06:27:28 AM »
Agreed.

A 15% + increase in performance without using additional fuel sound to good to be true, when I see the amount that diesel fuel foams when filling a jug and then goes clear after sitting make you wonder how much air is still left in the fuel.  I have no problem understanding that if a system has aerated fuel from suction leaks or combustion gas leak from a bad injector cup or seal that injector life suffers, but how much does a small amount of air impact wear and performance.

That's why I thought it would to good to post the question if anyone has tried one of the systems.



ZiggyH

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Offline ziggyh

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Re: Fuel air removal
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2014, 07:44:21 PM »
Brett, if you are interested have a look at this article from Parker on the air in fuel.

http://www.parker.com/literature/Racor/Mobile_Air_Separation_In_Diesel_Fuel.pdf

ZiggyH

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Offline Brett Wolfe

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Re: Fuel air removal
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2014, 08:03:08 PM »
Thanks, Ziggy.

Very interesting.

Per the article, as long as the filter outlet is at or very near the top of the filter, the small bubbles of air will "pass through" the injection system on our size diesels with little affect. If the outlet is further down, it can allow larger bubbles to form and when they "pass through" they can interrupt the fuel flow long enough to cause a momentary power loss on any cylinder getting a dose of air instead of diesel.

I don't know enough of the engineering of the various fuel systems by Cat and Cummins to know which would easily "self-bleed" the air back to the fuel tank via the return line and which would actually try to inject air (causing a momentary power loss).

BUT, I have never heard this discussed by truckers or RV'ers (or even VW owners for that matter).

If there were a place where I would have expected this to affect me personally it would be on our sailboat.  In a seaway, the diesel sloshes all over the fuel tank.  The diesel engine is a small 4 cylinder marinized Kobota.  It has never missed a beat, even in rough seas running for 24 hours at a time.

Might be one of those "interesting things" that really don't cause real-world issues.

Offline Bitster98

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Re: Fuel air removal
« Reply #9 on: December 11, 2014, 04:23:00 AM »
Removing tiny air bubbles entrained in diesel with a high volume pump and common spin on filter? Seems like a stretch to me. That being said they are a pretty good pump&filter system. When I had to do a r&r on the ip pump on my 2001 dodge 4x4 pickup I put the fass 95 gph on it instead of using the stock pump&filter. It has worked well for many years. These setups are mostly used by guys doing the hot rod-rolling coal thing. More fuel more smoke. Joe.

Offline ziggyh

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Re: Fuel air removal
« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2014, 05:39:33 PM »
When I think of the small volume of fuel that is injected for a combustion event and 10 %  of it is absorbed air, it's hard to believe that there would be a noticeable difference with performance and injector wear and tear.  Think I'm still on the fence with this and also need to see more test.
ZiggyH

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