Author Topic: Heading out with falling temps...do I need to add anti-gel  (Read 4426 times)

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Offline Pinkertonk

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Heading out with falling temps...do I need to add anti-gel
« on: January 07, 2016, 06:10:14 AM »
New to diesels and cold weather.  We have a '03 Fleetwood Discovery with a 3126E CAT.  The tanks are full of local diesel (purchased in Huntsville, Alabama).  We live in North Alabama and it is not going to get below 35 before we leave.  However, we're planning on heading south for a few days and the day we leave the temp is supposed to start falling from the 40's to the 20's.  It looks like it will not be below freezing when we leave but it will probably be in the mid 30's for a few hours until we get ahead of the cold weather.

Do I need to be concerned about fuel gelling?  If so, what do I need to do?
Kerry Pinkerton
2003 Fleetwood Discovery 3126 Cat
77 GMC motorhome
North Alabama

Offline Brett Wolfe

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Re: Heading out with falling temps...do I need to add anti-gel
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2016, 08:15:39 AM »
Kerry,

Sure would not hurt to add some PS anti-gel (any Walmart).

You may not need it if the below freezing temperatures are only following a day's drive, as the fuel in the tank will be heated by driving (recirculated warm fuel from engine back to tank).

But, for a couple of dollars, probably not worth the worry.

Brett

Offline Tom Bernardi

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Re: Heading out with falling temps...do I need to add anti-gel
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2016, 05:21:01 AM »
Kerry,

You probably also want to use your block heater the night before you leave if you are connected to electric.

Tom
Tom
2017 Newmar Dutch Star 4054 / Freightliner 450HP Cummins ISL / Blue Ox Avail / '17 Jeep Wrangler Sahara / Brake Buddy /
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Offline Brett Wolfe

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Re: Heading out with falling temps...do I need to add anti-gel
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2016, 06:19:58 AM »
Yes, time for the block heater to work really depends on ambient temperature.

If above 40 degrees F, it is not necessary, but an hour or two will speed warm-up.

At 20 degrees F, probably a couple of hours.

Overnight if temperatures are in the "negative" numbers.

Offline ziggyh

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Re: Heading out with falling temps...do I need to add anti-gel
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2016, 10:16:20 AM »
We live and camp in Manitoba till about the time the snow flies, will for sure agree that the cat engines with HEUI fuel systems need a plug 2-3 hours before a start at temps in the high thirties Fahrenheit,  at 35 deg F and colder things change fast, plugged in overnight especially when windy, use both sets of batteries, (good condition and fully charged) and don't forget about the proper viscosity of oil for your climate.  Cycle key several times for intake heater,

People with Cummings or common rail fuel systems seem to start better in the cold as well as people who have acqua hot systems with engine preheat.
ZiggyH

2007 Revolution LE
C9

Offline WILDEBILL308

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Re: Heading out with falling temps...do I need to add anti-gel
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2016, 06:17:36 PM »
Kerry, I live in Fort Worth and I add Power Service Diesel Fuel Supplement in the white bottle. I started around Thanksgiving as I never know when a cold front will drop temperatures to where gelling could be a problem.
I am in favor of using your block heater. Having it on for a couple of hours won't hurt and you will warm up faster.
Don't forget you can turn your furnace on to help keep you warm going down the road.
Bill 
2003 Bounder 38N,300 HP 5.9 Cummins
Allison 3000MH Trans.Towing 2014 Honda CRV. Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-